Marlins Strike Deal With NAACP

| | Comments (7)
handshake.jpg

The Marlins stadium deal has been on again/off again/on again so many times since we first covered it over a year ago, that it's hard to keep tabs on what exactly is going on. Two major votes on whether or not Miami will sign off and provide stadium funding happen next week. In the run-up to those votes, the team is trying to garner community support and has just signed a first of its kind deal with the NAACP that promises 15% of construction contracts go to black owned businesses.

The formal announcement will take place during a signing ceremony at the Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce Annual Business Leaders Luncheon at Jungle Island in Tree Top Ballroom in Miami.

"This is a great day for black business, not only in Miami, but nation-wide. It shows the strength of collaboration between the NAACP as an advocacy group and the chamber of commerce as an effective economic development organization. This agreement creates a standard for partnerships and how they should work in the Black community across the country," Bill Diggs, president and CEO of the Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce said.

On Thursday, the panel approved an item to expand a special taxing district on Overtown. It will generate millions of dollars for infrastructure, improvements and affordable housing in Overtown, NBC 6's Steve Litz reported.

Diggs said it is important that African-American contractors are involved in the process.

"We are talking about millions of dollars coming back to black-owned companies that can now take their kids to games because, guess what, their families are now working and they understand the value of that," he said.

Black community leaders stated initial reservations to the project last month. The Stadium will be built near the site of the old Orange Bowl in a predominantly black neighborhood known as Overtown. The State of Florida allots a certain amount of their state contracts to businesses owned by women and minorities but the Marlins are putting $155M of their own into the estimated $515M project, and have taken this step independently.

You can chalk much of it up to PR, but engaging community business is a great way for the Marlins to become part of the neighborhood they'll live in (provided this contract doesn't get in the way of competitive bidding). Meanwhile, as he ponders the ever dwindling numbers of African Americans in MLB, Bud Selig is probably wondering why he didn't think of something like this.


PREVIOUS: What's Up Creampuff: Dudes That Got Hurt   |   NEXT: Mickey Mantle For Post Cereal Trading Cards - 1960s

7 Comments

Black, white, don't matter who owns the businesses. Whoever builds the stadium, Guatemalans are gonna get jobs.

"Hanley was driving me around / to the handshake deals I brought to Overtown."

WHERE IS THE BLACK HAND?

Nothing good ever comes out of forced contracts.

@bc
That's what she said.

When they built Citizen's Bank, the city of Philadelphia demanded the Phillies give 15% of the contracts to href="http://www.gypsyloresociety.org/cultureintro.html">Travelers. WARNING: DON'T SIT IN ODD-NUMBERED SEATS AT CBP. TRUST ME.

Ugh.

When they built Citizen's Bank, the city of Philadelphia demanded the Phillies give 15% of the contracts to Travelers. WARNING: DON'T SIT IN ODD-NUMBERED SEATS AT CBP. TRUST ME.

No bid contracts.

I foresee no problems.

Leave a comment